Do not resuscitate

What would you do if?

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JJ50
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Do not resuscitate

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Post by JJ50 »

When my husband (72) came home from hospital on Monday after having a possible TIA, on which the jury is still out, we had a serious discussion. He said that if he had a major stroke he would not wish to be resuscitated. He reckons he has lost so much after his brain haemorrhage in 2006, which trashed half his brain not being able to do the things he can still do would be a fate far worse than death. We have discussed it with our children and they agree that his wish should be upheld.

Are there any posters on this forum who for religious reasons disagree with a person having the right to request not to be resuscitated if it became necessary?

Menotu
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Re: Do not resuscitate

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Post by Menotu »

JJ50 wrote: When my husband (72) came home from hospital on Monday after having a possible TIA, on which the jury is still out, we had a serious discussion. He said that if he had a major stroke he would not wish to be resuscitated. He reckons he has lost so much after his brain haemorrhage in 2006, which trashed half his brain not being able to do the things he can still do would be a fate far worse than death. We have discussed it with our children and they agree that his wish should be upheld.

Are there any posters on this forum who for religious reasons disagree with a person having the right to request not to be resuscitated if it became necessary?
Surely there are many on here that would have a problem. Many of them have problems with most everything - even if it's not outside their wheelhouse.
Having said that, it's really only the business of the one making the decision and their immediate family (if they have any)
Everyone else's issue with it are moot

nobspeople
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Re: Do not resuscitate

Post #3

Post by nobspeople »

JJ50 wrote: Thu Sep 12, 2019 5:11 am Are there any posters on this forum who for religious reasons disagree with a person having the right to request not to be resuscitated if it became necessary?
Probably. But I'm not one of them. A close Christian friend suffered for years and finally died recently. He was so tired of fighting, the tests, surgeries, hospital visits, use of special equipment, toll it took on his family, etc.
He as MORE than ready to end his suffering.
I think those that have issues with it have had little to no experience with real, physical, mental and economic suffering.
Have a great, potentially godless, day!

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Miles
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Re: Do not resuscitate

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Post by Miles »

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Just a note of advice.


As a first responder who is familiar with DNR and DNIs I'd like to share some advice.

In the state I work, for the paperwork allowing DNR's to be effective it must accompany the patient. That is, first aid responders will automatically start and continue resuscitation unless they see the signed DNR documents themselves. I know of several incidents where, after having started resuscitation, family members began swearing up and down that the patient didn't want to be resuscitated and had papers to prove it, but because they didn't have the papers at hand, the first responders could not, by law, stop their resuscitation efforts, and had to continue to do so until they arrived at the hospital where emergency room personnel took over the responsibility.

Because such laws vary from state to state, I advise people check out their own state's DNR laws.


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Rose2020
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Re: Do not resuscitate

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Post by Rose2020 »

It is absolutely the choice of the patient through the best advice of their consultant and a second opinion along with consensus of their nearest legal kin.

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Re: Do not resuscitate

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Post by nobspeople »

Rose2020 wrote: Mon Apr 04, 2022 6:31 pm It is absolutely the choice of the patient through the best advice of their consultant and a second opinion along with consensus of their nearest legal kin.
I'm confused:
Is it the right of the patient period, or the right of the patient AND their nearest kin?
If it includes their nearest kin, then it doesn't appear to be the absolute of the patient.
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Miles
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Re: Do not resuscitate

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Post by Miles »

nobspeople wrote: Mon Apr 11, 2022 2:46 pm
Rose2020 wrote: Mon Apr 04, 2022 6:31 pm It is absolutely the choice of the patient through the best advice of their consultant and a second opinion along with consensus of their nearest legal kin.
I'm confused:
Is it the right of the patient period, or the right of the patient AND their nearest kin?
If it includes their nearest kin, then it doesn't appear to be the absolute of the patient.
If I'm not mistaken Rose2020 lives in the UK, and you live in the USA, and as far as I'm aware in no state is a consensus of a consultant, a second opinion, or a second party ever needed to construct a DNR document; although, depending on the state, it will need to be signed by a oneself (except for Iowa) and perhaps a physician, or perhaps a wittiness or two, or perhaps a notary public, or some combination combination of these. Each state has its own requirements.

So, while evidently one must gather advice, opinions and consensus from others to make out a DNR document in the UK, in the states it can we be a wholly do-it-yourself enterprise.



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