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postroad
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 9:22 pm  Did God create chalk deposits? Reply with quote

Chalk is the microscope remains of untold billions of once living creatures compressed into a soft sedimentary rock.

In places it can be in the hundreds of feet thick.

Surely it wasn't created in the short time of the flood.

Doesn't this show that death reigned supreme long before Adam sinned?
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 41: Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:18 pm
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[Replying to post 39 by EarthScienceguy]

the chalk deposits are consist almost entirely of the organisms that exist in sunlit low nutrient water. That is they are self limiting. In high nutrient situations they are out competed by different orgisms and the limits of light penetrating the water.

In places the calciferous ooze in parts of the ocean are over five miles thick. The reason it was and still is composed almost entirely of the same material is because it's what makes it to the bottom without being reabsorbed into the nutrient cycle.

You seem to be waffling on the composition of the chalk? Sometimes remarking on its purity and other times its impurities?

Interestingly the fossils found in chalk never represent the smorgasbord of living things you insist the soup during the flood was made of.

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Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 42: Mon Feb 11, 2019 2:59 pm
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[Replying to postroad]

Quote:
the chalk deposits are consist almost entirely of the organisms that exist in sunlit low nutrient water. That is they are self limiting. In high nutrient situations they are out competed by different organisms and the limits of light penetrating the water.


for the second time

t should also be noted that phytoflagellates such as these are able to feed on bacteria, that is, planktonic species are capable of heterotrophism (they are ‘mixotrophic’). Such bacteria would have been in abundance, breaking down the masses of floating and submerged organic debris (dead fish, plants, animals, etc.) generated by the flood. Thus production of coccolithophores and foraminifera is not dependent on sunlight, the supply of organic material potentially supporting a dense concentration.

Encyclop&ælig;dia Britannica, 15th edition, 1992, 26:283.

Quote:
In places the calciferous ooze in parts of the ocean are over five miles thick. The reason it was and still is composed almost entirely of the same material is because it's what makes it to the bottom without being reabsorbed into the nutrient cycle.


Quote:
All limestones have over 50 per cent calcium carbonate and true limestones have over 90 per cent calcite. Much of the Carboniferous limestones and parts of the Cretaceous chalk of England have less than one per cent impurities.

However, most sedimentary rocks (and limestone is no exception) have a mixture of impurities — these might be sand grains, silt, mud, etc.

A rock that has more than 50 per cent impurities is not a limestone (but it might be a calcareous sandstone or a calcareous mudstone)

https://www.bgs.ac.uk/discoveringGeology/geologyOfBritain/limestoneLandscapes/wh...


There are lots of different types of limestone but only a small portion is chalk. It is called chalk because of the purity.

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You seem to be waffling on the composition of the chalk? Sometimes remarking on its purity and other times its impurities?


Are you saying that chalk doesn't have fossils in it? Would you have any evidence for this belief?

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Interestingly the fossils found in chalk never represent the smorgasbord of living things you insist the soup during the flood was made of.


Which one of the following are you saying is not in chalk?

English chalk bed fossils include many big seafloor animals like sponges, corals, bryozoans (lace corals), brachiopods (lamp shells), bivalves (clams), gastropods (snails), ammonites, nautiloids, belemnites, arthropods (crabs and lobsters), and echinoderms (crinoids, starfish, and anemones).4 The chalk beds also contain a host of other creatures—the fossilized jaws and teeth of fish, and fossil remains of turtles, ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, marine lizards, flying reptiles (pterosaurs), and even dinosaurs, which lived on land.

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Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 43: Mon Feb 11, 2019 4:01 pm
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[Replying to post 42 by EarthScienceguy]

And not a single buffalo, human, giraffe, etc

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