Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  Next

Reply to topic
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 1: Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:53 pm
Reply
Scientifc accuracy in the Scriptures.

Like this post
Based on the concept of omniscience, many claim the plain language of the Scriptures should be scientifically accurate. So, if there were a verse that said that the Sun is the center of the solar system, would that make it acceptable on that basis?

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 2: Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:45 pm
Reply

Like this post
*****************OP CORRECTION***********************

Sorry, I meant solar system. I can't seem to edit the OP on this computer.

Moderator Action

Fixed.

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 3: Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:13 am
Reply
Re: Scientifc accuracy in the Scriptures.

Like this post
[Replying to post 1 by bluethread]

If it could be shown that Sumerian precursors hadn't made it common knowledge, yes...

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 4: Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:31 am
Reply
Re: Scientifc accuracy in the Scriptures.

Like this post
Willum wrote:

[Replying to post 1 by bluethread]

If it could be shown that Sumerian precursors hadn't made it common knowledge, yes...


The initial source of the assertion is not really the question. The question is, if the Scriptures plainly stated that the sun was the center of the solar system and the planets orbit the sun, would that statement meet the requirement that a revelation from a deity be scientifically accurate?

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 5: Fri Aug 25, 2017 12:51 pm
Reply
Re: Scientifc accuracy in the Scriptures.

Like this post
[Replying to post 4 by bluethread]

No it would not. It was not a revelation since there were a number of cultures that understood that as every day common knowledge.

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 6: Fri Aug 25, 2017 1:18 pm
Reply
Re: Scientifc accuracy in the Scriptures.

Like this post
bluethread wrote:

Willum wrote:

[Replying to post 1 by bluethread]

If it could be shown that Sumerian precursors hadn't made it common knowledge, yes...


The initial source of the assertion is not really the question. The question is, if the Scriptures plainly stated that the sun was the center of the solar system and the planets orbit the sun, would that statement meet the requirement that a revelation from a deity be scientifically accurate?

It would meet the requirement that something written down and attributed to a deity was accurate, but it wouldn't prove revelation unless we could rule out other sources from having the information another way.

For example, if I write down on a piece of paper: The sun is composed primarily of hydrogen (an element composed of a single proton and a single electron) and helium (an element composed of 2 protons, 2 neutrons, and 2 electrons). Love God.

Would this count as scientifically accurate revelation by a deity?

If I instead wrote down: The sun is composed of primarily water. Love God.

What would tip you off that it's not really inspired by God? Why should we treat ridiculous statements in the Bible any different when they contradict known science?

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 7: Fri Aug 25, 2017 1:28 pm
Reply
Re: Scientifc accuracy in the Scriptures.

Like this post
H.sapiens wrote:

[Replying to post 4 by bluethread]

No it would not. It was not a revelation since there were a number of cultures that understood that as every day common knowledge.


I am not addressing how we got the information. I am asking whether the information is sufficient to pass the a deity would know better test. That is that, if there is anything attributed to a deity, it must be scientifically accurate.

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 8: Fri Aug 25, 2017 1:35 pm
Reply
Re: Scientifc accuracy in the Scriptures.

Like this post
bluethread wrote:

H.sapiens wrote:

[Replying to post 4 by bluethread]

No it would not. It was not a revelation since there were a number of cultures that understood that as every day common knowledge.


I am not addressing how we got the information. I am asking whether the information is sufficient to pass the a deity would know better test. That is that, if there is anything attributed to a deity, it must be scientifically accurate.

Yes you are, the entire concept of a revelation is based on the idea that the information was revealed by a deity, if something is common knowledge it can not be "revealed" except in a Monty Python skit.

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 9: Fri Aug 25, 2017 1:47 pm
Reply

Like this post
I think I get the purpose of this thread. If there is a deity, and he thinks himself smart, then whatever he says should at the very least be in line with what basic scientific inquiry should show. That is, any deity can be shown to be a moron if he claims the planets orbit the Earth; similarly, as long as the information presented isn't incorrect, a non-revelation verse can still show basic scientific literacy as long as it's actually correct.

But the thing here is, when putting pen to paper, the Scriptures clearly have the influence of other cultures in them. Everything from the polytheistic undertones to the myriad expressions of Yahweh's attributes (that vary based on author and time period), without enough consistency to even make the claim that the same entity is the one present throughout biblical history. I certainly don't care if Yahweh is quoted as saying "Well earth is round, so there you go," if in previous books he went with, "Yeah, I stretched out the sky like a tent." Because the deity being written about has had wildly different expressions, and scientifically accurate was never actually been one of the iterations of Yahweh shown throughout the Old and New Testaments. And the reason for that is pretty basic: The authors were scientifically illiterate, and saw no reason to have the god they write about be anything more than a "father, king, savior, shepherd, refuge," without ever really doing a good job of selling the idea that he is also a "teacher," or "scientist."

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Post BBCode URL - Right click and save to clipboard to use later in post Post 10: Fri Aug 25, 2017 2:51 pm
Reply

Like this post
benchwarmer wrote:

bluethread wrote:

Willum wrote:

[Replying to post 1 by bluethread]

If it could be shown that Sumerian precursors hadn't made it common knowledge, yes...


The initial source of the assertion is not really the question. The question is, if the Scriptures plainly stated that the sun was the center of the solar system and the planets orbit the sun, would that statement meet the requirement that a revelation from a deity be scientifically accurate?


It would meet the requirement that something written down and attributed to a deity was accurate, . . .


Man, there is a lot of concern over whether an accurate scientific statement would prove that there is a deity. However, that is not the question. It is the opposite question. It has been argued that information in a holy book that is not accurate scientifically discredits that holy book. It appears that you believe the statement in the OP would not, in and of itself, discredit that holy book on those grounds. Is that indeed you position?

Goto top, bottom
View user's profile 
Display posts from previous:   

Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  Next

Jump to:  
Facebook
Tweet

 




On The Web | Ecodia | Hymn Lyrics Apps
Facebook | Twitter

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group.   Produced by Ecodia.

Igloo   |  Lo-Fi Version